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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 521 (some duplicates have been removed)
political figure in america who is anything remotely like that. michael bloomberg. new york city's mayor. he's an ex-republican and ex-democrat. he's now an independent. he's in his third term as the highly visible mayor of america's largest city. before it happened today, nobody expected michael bloomberg to make an endorsement at all in this year's presidential race. that's mostly because he said he wouldn't. back in june mr. bloomberg made sure to be overheard telling people at a party in new york city he intended to remain publicly neutral in this year's presidential race. but then today he didn't. in the midst of this city's ongoing and complicated and exhausting and heartbreaking and painstaking response to this unprecedented storm, the mayor of new york city published this 17-paragraph endorsement of president obama. the fact that nobody knew it was coming and that he said he wouldn't make an endorsement just made it that much more important. as did the fact it was not at all clear if he was going to make an endorsement the guy who he would endorse would be president obama. i mean, mi
in a densely packed, tightly inhabited urban area, just across the hudson river from new york city, in hoboken, new jersey, correspondent katy tur has been covering there for us all day, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian, for the first time since monday night people are able to leave their homes to get a good sense of what the damage is. but the water is still very high in a number of these areas, and they're not expecting it to be fully gone until at least tomorrow night. 20,000 people trapped, hoboken became a virtual island as 500 million gallons of water overwhelmed the town. by wednesday morning the national guard came in to help, delivering much needed food and supplies to those still stranded. >> one thing we truly need is more fuel. >> reporter: the hoboken mayor. >> we need more fuel, resources, food so anybody who is listening to this in the city of hoboken or neighboring towns who can get to us, we ask you to come and deliver your supplies. >> reporter: as the length of this mixture of water, sewer, and oil turned into ponds, some got their first chance to assess the da
is returning to normal in new york city. all three airports are open as of today as is the new york stock exchange and broadway shows. problems still persist. traffic in the city is nothing short of a nightmare without public transportation wednesday manhattan streets were clogged with people trying to get back to work. there's some good news. subway and train service is starting up again today at least on a limited basis. >> i am declaring a transportation emergency. >> reporter: mayor bloomberg is mandating that all cars driving into manhattan has to have at least three people. >> i know it is inconvenient for a lot of people but the streets can only handle so much. >> reporter: half of all gas stations in the area are closed. the result, long lines. >> hundreds of cars here trying to get gas. >> reporter: analysts say it could get another week to get all the gas stations back up and running. lack of power continues to be a problem in this area of manhattan. officials say, though, that people in manhattan may see the lights go back on as early as tomorrow or saturday. in other parts of
,000 still stranded in this new jersey town. >>> crisis in new york. nearly half the city without power. at least two dozen dead, as the biggest hospitals fight to stay up and running. forced to evacuate the sickest patients down dark flights of stairs. >>> and, the aftermath. our team travels to the outer edges of the storm's fury, to towns demolished by a giant wall of water, where people were rescued from rooftops and sandy's misery stretches on. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with bill weir and cynthia mcfadden in new york city, and terry moran in tom's river, new jersey, this is a special edition of "nightline," the perfect storm. october 31st, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran and i'm in tom's river, new jersey, one of the hard-hit communities on the water in this state. the water that superstorm andy hurled against the atlantic seaboard from maryland, all the way up to new york city and beyond. so many communities utterly devastated. you can see this kind of scene, as you see behind me, mile after mile on this coast. and two days after landfall now, the
are broadcasting from new york city and st. louis, missouri. the death toll of superstorm sandy along the eastern seaboard has jumped to 98 as more bodies are recovered by the dead. 40 people have been killed in new york city, half of them on staten island, which was overcome with devastating flooding. staten island residents have criticized local and federal officials for allegedly ignoring recovery there, saying they're in desperate need of aid. new york city is facing criticism for continuing with its famed annual marathon nday, , spite calls for postponement. supporters of a delay have argued the marathon will divert attention and resources from aiding the hundreds of thousands who still lacked power and are in need of relief. utility officials have predicted that electricity will be mostly restored to lower manhattan by the weekend. though several million from long island to new jersey could be in the dark for a least another week, some 1.6 million people remain without power in new jersey. it is e state hardest hit by the storm. new jersey officials have disclosed some 336,000 gallons of di
or destruction. in new york city, the sun finally came out today, along with the first sounds of recovery. ( bell ringing ) the stock market opened for the first time this week. buses are back and there could be some subway service tomorrow. the biggest challenge remains pumping floodwaters out of tunnels. the u.s. military is helping, and we flew along today with lieutenant general thomas bostic, commander of the army corps of engineers. >> pelley: the police released this video today of staten island residents being rescued from their flooded homes. president obama joined governor chris christie on a tour of the new jersey shore, where sandy made landfall monday evening. >> we are not going to tolerate red tape. we are not going to tolerate bureaucracy. and i've instituted a 15-minute rule, essentially, on my team. you return everybody's phone calls in 15 minutes, whether it's the mayors, the governors, county officials. if they need something, we figure out a way to say yes. >> pelley: three days ago, this was a neighborhood of families. this evening, folks are returning to find all of their p
. i can report to you right now, the new york city sanitation has set dump trucks and tractors that are at the end of this street picking up debris. the floodwater actually destroyed property inside the homes. take a look at this pile of garbage. refrigerators, furniture, all of this has to be dumped and take it out of here. if it sits here with the water damage, it will begin to mold. they are setting up port of parties so they can have sanitation. verizon is setting up a tower. that is a situation right now. we have been watching total strangers come by on this street offering food and water to people who live here. that is the latest from the situation here. no need to tell you they are. that's the marathon will be run did they think it should be postponed for another week. connell: thank you very much, adam. dagen: by the way, i just re- tweeted a column about why the marathon should not be run. power outages, meantime, still causing major problems. unbelievable, almost undescribable problems for drivers. take a look at this video. long lines at gas stations. not because of
limited service between new york city and boston. new jersey transit will start moving today with limited service. the new york subway system making advances, little by little. the m-train, which links queens to manhattan, just started run. there are still no trains running from low 34th street where half of manhattan remains this morning in the dark. so the millions of new yorkers who depend on subways are now waiting, as you can see in these pictures, in long lines for city buses. for those who drive into the new york city area, the lines stretched for miles yesterday. enough to make you turn around and stay home. in an effort to ease gridlock in the city, the mayor has ordered all vehicles entering manhattan must have at least three passengers. that stands for the rest of the week. there are check points set up on the way into the city with cars not meeting the three-person rule being turned away. and you're only beginning to make your way to new york, if you're lucky, to find gas or cars. about 80% of new jersey stations are either without power or without fuel. those that do have gas
towards normalcy. >>> in new york this morning, more signs of life getting back to routine. the city's massive subway system is roaring back to life. except in hard-hit manhattan. >> more power is being restored to that area, as well. that's where we find abc's mark greenblatt once again this morning. good morning, mark. >> reporter: good morning to you. right now, the death toll from hurricane sandy stands at a grisly 74. and over in new jersey, there's a looming threat ona and ongoine from ruptured natural gas lines. but in this neighborhood in lower manhattan, the lights are on for the first morning since sandy struck. the nation's largest public transit system will begin rolling again this morning, but with limited service. some tunnels and stations remain flooded. and power is still out in much of downtown. but the lights began to turn back on in some areas near wall street. still, subways won't run yet to the city's financial district. traffic clogged the streets as people returned to work. new york city mayor bloomberg announced only vehicles with three or more occupants will
that the storm killed 94 people in the united states. here in new york, the latest count by city officials indicates now 37 deaths, 19 of those on staten island alone. the red cross today century spons units to the hardest hit areas to distribute water. fema officials arrived there today with food and supplied. governor christie's office announced today that new jersey transit will restart with service tomorrow. officials are working to expand the limited service of the subways. amtrack will begin to run partial service of the city tomorrow. growing problem will be lines at stations stretching for more than a mile. in the city of yonkers officials are limits customers to no more than ten gallons. in south manhattan people went through dumpsters today to look for unspoiled food thrown out by a super market. officials warning that the east coast could be hit by another storm this time next week. the devastation on staten island the new york borough that was the hardest hit. we get the latest from nbc news correspondent. anne? >> good evening. three days after the hurricane. people in this co
that staten island was hit the hard est of all the areas of new york city. >> when you look at the geography of it it is the most exposed and direct ocean exposure up there and what i have been wondering about. was it a matter of us getting the tv cameras down there in order to get the attention that media resources were distributed in lower manhattan and elsewhere. but it seems like the media got there before government help started focusing obthere. when you have media and senators together. they bring along the media and i think having them come out here and pointing the spotlight on what we have been seeing for the last few days first hand got people's attention. and people realized how really bad it is out here on staten island and i think it does. the media in the last couple of day days in other areas of the region how bad it is i think today we have seen the results of that coverage just this morning. we now have red cross out here. the national guard has a presentation out here as of tonight. so, it has had a positive impact shining that spotlight on staten island and what we are go
. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic city's casinos are back in business. what are the odds of that? but for many more, the misery inflicted by the monster storm feels like it is becoming permanent, homes destroyed, neighborhoods gone, a lifetime's investment wiped out. >> it is like you had a cute little home and now you have no place to stay. i mean, you don't have a home to live in. >> reporter: across new york, new jersey, and connecticut, recovery comes in many forms. for some, it is a full tank of gas. for others, it's when the lights go back on. and for one man in new jersey, it's seeing the utility truck arrive on his street. >> i looked outside and was -- felt like christmas. somebody delivering new telephone poles. this is the most happy feeling
their lives in this storm is now up to at least 87 in nine states. in new york city, firefighters and police went door to door checking on residents. mayor michael bloomberg said the death toll in the city is up to 37 now. today, police recovered the bodies of two staten island children who were literally torn from their mother's arms and swept away on floodwaters monday. millions of people in 11 states from virginia to new hampshire are spending a fourth night in the dark. nearly 4.5 million homes and businesses are without electricity. but the cavalry is on the way. the air force is shipping utility trucks and power generators from california aboard 17 aircraft. and the new york city subway startrunning again, but the service was very limited. that meant long lines for buses. >> watch your step. be careful with the person in front of you. >> pelley: and even longer lines of cars cross the bridges into manhattan. in new jersey and on long island, cars lined up as far as the eye could see for gasoline. many stations are closed, either out of gas or without power for the pumps. in some parts
. >> reporter: it's a nightmare in new york city for some. despite limited subway and mass transit service up and running, it's a super slow go and thousands have to commute by foot. >> walked across the brooklyn bridge. >> in manhattan hundreds of thousands still in the dark, some cold and starving. >> people are dumpster diving and what they are going after is the food. >> reporter: it may be days before the power is back. >> over 100,000 power lines on ground. >> reporter: across new york's long island power is out and patience is running out. >> i don't have the transportation out of here. >> reporter: in toms river, new jersey, a high school is now a shelter. in westwarck, connecticut, belongings remain strewn about. >> we need to get cleaned out. >> reporter: in west virginia the weight from sandy's heavy snow on monday has now collapsed roofs. the storm's wrath widespread and strong. >> no heat. we have no power. >> reporter: still, officials are encouraging. >> the good news is that there are a lot of people who want to help. >> reporter: but the grim reality, not so easy to swaggo, s
american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoirs. in the new york city system, water is collected and stored in 19 reservoirs, which can hold more than a year's supply -- over 580 billion gallons of water. almost all of the system is fed by gravity, without the use of energy-consum
hoboken clearly from the west side of new york city. and as of last night, the mayor told us, there were as many as 20,000 people, of the population 50,000 people in the city, there were as many as 20,000 people still stranded in deep, impassable, and increasingly polluted floodwaters. the national guard did get to some of those people, starting late last night and into today. we'll have more about that very dramatic situation in just a moment. the national guard also arrived this morning in moonachie, new jersey, where the storm surge swamped the town very, very quickly. people in all sorts of housing in moonachie were caught unaware and trapped, but particularly folks in mobile homes had a very difficult time there. members of the national guard also rushed to the assistance today of new york city' bellevue hospital, which has been running on generators ever since the lower half of manhattan lost power monday night, when sandy came ashore. 17 million gallons of water flooded bellevue hospital's basement. after that shot we showed you last night of hospital employees making a human chai
up, on the day. the very day, that the president of the united states came to new york city to see more of the damage done by hurricane sandy, today, the stars of fox and friends who actually work in new york city showed they have no idea how bad hurricane sandy really was here. fox and friends are in tonight's rewrite. i want to look natural, not naked! but look! with covergirl, all you need is 3 little things to make beauty powerful for you. lashblast for voluptuous volume, outlast -- to keep your lips beautiful and not come off if you kiss... simply ageless foundation to help you look young. see? just three. easy breezy beautiful covergirl. ♪ can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll
slamming new york city. >> few more days and no power new york might get weird. >> on cbs "this morning." >> speaking foreign language >> when your city is flooding that's as bad as antonio [ bleep ] banderas. >>> welcome to cbs "this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york, norah o'donnell is in washington. the extent of superstorm sandy's damage has become clearer and more alarming, five a day. this morning sandy is blamed for 75 deaths in ten states. and about 5 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city many subway and commuter trains are now running and the city has put restrictions on drivers trying to get into manhattan. drivers also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. this morning hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore are facing months even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in things where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself on wednesday. jeff, good morning. >> reporter: norah, good morning to you. 14 are dead in new jersey but there is increasing concern that as more homes are searched
and running as normal. >>> the new york city marathon will take place on sunday. the new york road runners announced they will be donating $1 million as part of the campaign to help victims of sandy. con on versy surrounding the race. some felt it was trivial or too much of a burden on police to hold the marathon. but new york road runners say running the race shows the city's resilience. >> if the decision made the decision to cancel this race, there would have been at least as great of con vo tro versy, because this has always been known as the greatest day in the life of the city. >> nearly 47,000 runners participated in last year's marathon, the organization says they are expected up to 20% fewer runners in this race because of sandy. people are still undecided about whether or not the road runners should continue with the race. a lot of people backing out. a lot of people from our area. >> the police department and mayor says this will not impact the police department and other agencies have to do with the rest of the city as a result the storm that's come through. at the same time, t
amtrak will begin offering limited service between new york city and boston. and new jersey transit will also start moving today with limited service. the new york subway system continues to make advances. the "m" train linking queens to manhattan just started running, but there are still no trains running below 34th street where half of manhattan remains in the dark. so the millions of new yorkers who depend on subways, they're now waiting in those long lines for buses. for those who drive into new york city, the lines at city bridges stretched for miles yesterday, enough to make you turn around and just stay home. it's simply not worth it. it will take all day to get in in some cases. in an effort to ease gridlock inside the city, the mayor has ordered all vehicles entering manhattan to have at least three passengers for the rest of the week. there are checkpoints set up on the way into manhattan with cars not meeting the three-person rule, those cars turned away. and you're only beginning to make your way into new york if you're lucky enough to find gas for your cars. about 80% o
mister. >> and all that matters. >> amazing time-lapsed video of sandy slamming new york city, the water rushing in, power going out. >> new york might get weird with a few more days without power. [ speaking spanish ] >> when your city is flooded, that is as fluent as antonio >> when your city is flooded, that is as fluent as antonio [ bleep ] banderas. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm charlie rose in new york. norah o'donnell is in washington. as you wake up in the west, the extent of superstorm sandy's damage is becoming cloe ining c more alarming. blamed for 75 deaths in 10 states and 4.6 million homes and businesses still have no electricity. >> in new york city, many subway and xhouter trains are now running. drivers are seeing huge traffic jams going into manhattan. they also face severe gas shortages throughout the new york metro area. hundreds of thousands of people along the new jersey shore this morning are facing months, even years of rebuilding. jeff glor is in atlantic city, where president obama saw the power of sandy for himself. jeff, good
and suffering, it is seemingly the one problem that really touched a nerve. why the new york city marathon became such a lightning rod in the wake of the storm. >>> and it turns out one car was not as advertised. how owners will be compensated for some bad math. >>> good evening, i'm ken bastida. >> i'm dana king. frustrations and anger mounting over gas shortages, power outages and relief supplies four days after super storm sandy. here's the latest. 110 deaths are now blamed on that storm. and that number is expected to rise as more bodies are found in destroyed homes. just over 3 million people are without power and that is down from more than 8 million during the height of the storm. and more than 47,000 runners have been told this weekend's new york marathon has been canceled. >>> among the hardest hit area is staten island new york. the body of two people strapped by a 13-foot surge of water were found today. one was hanging out a window. a few hours before, one woman escaped with her three children. >> it hurts. i mean i cried for a few days, but there is nothing left to do. there i
to one business owner who says order is unof ravelling fast. >>> a firestorm erupt over the new york city marathon, generators, water, valuable resources are being used while countless new yorkers are still suffering. the mayor says the race will go on. i think it is crazy. a legendary marathon runner is here exclusively to disagree with me. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: all right. first let's take a look at the day's market headlines. better than expected october jobs report failed to lift stocks after some early gains, the major indices tumbled closing at session lows. the dow fell 139 points. shares of chesapeake energy helped drag down energy stocks. the natural gas producer reported a third quarter loss and said it is delaying scheduled asset sales. there was one bright spot though on the day for sure. that was starbucks. shares of the coffee giant soared 9%. it solid beat fiscal fourth quarter earnings estimates while raising the full-year profit outlook. look at that stock. >>> now to our top story. the dire gas shortage is a consequence of the super
do. >>> the day after hurricane sandy hit the northeast, new york city mayor michael bloomberg was asked whether he was expecting a visit from president obama. >> we'd love to have him but we've got lots of things to do and i'm not trying to dis him but i know he had planned a trip to new jersey and i said that's fine it represents the whole region. >> today the president is touring parts of the storm ravaged new york. we'll discuss the administration's potential role and recovery and the looming issue of climate change when deputy mayor howard wolfson joins us.. to voice recognition. e-trade leads the way in wherever, whenever investing. download the ultimate in mobile investing apps, free, at e-trade. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. it's so great to see you. you, too! oh, cloudy glasses. you didn't have to come over! actually, honey, i think i did...
. now lying in piles of rubble that stretch for miles across the new york city borough of staten island. cleanup is underway. and with every new layer of debris that's removed, the tragic stories emerge of the residents whose lives have been turned upside down. cnn's brian todd is on the scene for us. brian, what are you seeing on staten island right now? >> reporter: well, wolf, at just about every house you go to in the section of staten island you hear horrific and pretty detailed stories of just how bad the storm was. here's the story of one man who took a few hits. if you can't imagine what it's like to suffer through a massive storm, listen to nick. >> the water was so high. it was up to this part of the door. i couldn't get into the door. i went around the side of the house. and i stood on a box that was floating. and i went through the window to get back in the house with my family. >> reporter: taking us through his house on staten island, the retired ups truck driver says he and his family scrambledto n upper floor away from water he was sure was going to keep rising. his wife
, news that is especially welcome here on this hard-hit island. the new york city marathon scheduled for sunday which starts here on the island has been canceled for the first time in its 42-year history, and that is a huge welcome relief to a lot of people here, who frankly were just outraged the idea that the marathon would take place and would take resources that are still badly needed here. there's a lot of people here on this island tonight who feel like they have been forgotten and it really wasn't until today that they started to see supplies coming in and a lot of it in the area that i'm in right now, is just volunteers. folks who have come here on their own from other parts of the city or other parts of staten island with food, whatever they can bring. there's a lot of folks who live down the street in pitch blackness and they're afraid to leave their destroyed houses because of safety concerns. they don't want to leave their things out. this is the home of a woman named sheila. it's all that's left of her home. she's lived here for some 40 years. she was able to salvage a f
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 521 (some duplicates have been removed)